Her Stars

Doretta taught eighth-grade English, and lived alone, a block
from the school.  She was “Miss” Hay to everyone, and
even though the boys never thought twice about it, the
girls in her classes knew that meant she was an Old Maid,
a figure on a card in a game that you didn’t want to end up
holding in your hand.  And so they knew she was something
they didn’t want to end up being, not if they could help it.

She would walk home each night to her little apartment,
grade papers for awhile, then make dinner for one or
maybe have another teacher over, either a spinster like herself
or a woman whose husband was out of town or who took
pity on her; an evening not unlike that of nearly every other
household in town, with or without a family, until night fell.
As others turned on their TVs, Doretta turned out the lights

and looked out her window at the stars—her stars!—which
had provided the human race with peaceful and sublime
entertainment for eons, since the Greeks and before.  She
couldn’t understand why people would spend good,
hard-earned money on a television when they could look
up at the sky every night—for free!—and trace the images
that had inspired poets, that had transfixed astronomers

and physicists.  The stars—that gave man a sense of how
insignificant he was, and yet how there was a grand design
to the universe.  She counted herself fulfilled if, out of each
year’s eighth-graders, she could awaken a sense of wonder
at the heavens, if she could cause just one idle or errant
young boy to step outside at night and look up at the skies
and lose himself, as she did, in the infinity he beheld there.

When winter arrived she told her students to look for Orion,
the hunter, with his tri-starred belt and his sword and club.
With his two dogs, Canis Major and Canis Minor, behind him,
and Taurus the bull advancing towards him, and Lepus the hare
escaping detection at his feet–that, she always hoped,
would interest the boys, who would sometimes come to class
sleepy-eyed from a night of coon hunting with their fathers.

And yet she was lucky to catch the fancy of even one of them.
The girls would dutifully hand in their reports, with neat drawings
of the constellations, but the boys were a different story.
Some would nod off in the late afternoon, others
would stare out the window, thinking of football or basketball practice—or girls.
Some would hand in nothing, others just a half-hearted stab at
the assignment—incomplete, illegible, incomprehensible.

One day walking home from school she noticed a bulldozer and
a truck on the lot next door to her building, where a small
home sat, fallen into disrepair.  What, she wondered, was in store?
Each day as she passed she saw progress in the form of demolition,
then the lot cleared, then a concrete foundation, then a garish
hamburger restaurant—little more than a metal shack–rising
from the dust, its walls bright white and glass and shiny metal.

Then the lot was paved, and lines painted, and an enormous sign
erected.  Well, she thought, it might be nice to drop in there at
night some time and pick up dinner instead of cooking.
Sometimes she was tired, and just wanted to close her
eyes at the end of the day before she turned them towards the
heavens.  And so she waited for the grand opening, and decided
to treat herself to a hamburger and some French fries and a

milkshake the first night.  She took the food up to her apartment
and ate them at her table and thought it wasn’t bad—
not something she’d do every night, but a nice break when
she didn’t want to cook. She finished and cleaned up
and, as usual, turned off the lights and took
her place at her window to look at the stars and saw—nothing.
The lights from drive-in and the sign had turned the sky above to a
milky white instead of a deep blue, and the stars—her stars—were gone.

From “Town Folk & Country People.”

4 thoughts on “Her Stars

  1. I too have SO many memories of Miss Waite. I learned what constellations were and I had never seen Orion before. I remember going outside in January (for homework) and looking up in the sky to find the his “belt” of stars and being thrilled….and each winter I do now find Orion in the night sky. I remember that she read us Old Testament Bible stories that I had not heard. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey were new to me and I love learning both the Greek and Latin names. I remember pomegranate day as well….that was a very exotic fruit that I had never seen! She was a very good teacher!…..I do remember sitting in her class when we heard President Kennedy had died. I also remember in May having the windows open and watching the antics of “Kid Day” for the seniors with water guns…….I think they canceled that tradition by the time we were seniors. Thanks Con for your wonderful blog.

    • Thanks. By the way, the Griff’s sign has been featured in a nationally syndicated comic strip–several times. It’s by a guy named Bill Griffiths and he seems to like the little hamburger man up at the top.

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